Create a Cover Photo for a Facebook Page Using Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop

Easily create a custom cover photo for a Facebook page using Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop with these easy steps. Avoid the frustration of uploading a photo directly to Facebook only to find out it doesn’t fit right and can’t be used. By preparing your photos first in either Lightroom or Photoshop it allows you to have more flexibility and control over how the photo will appear and allow you to use almost any photo.
HD Video Version

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/46188441″>How to create a Facebook Cover in Lightroom and Photoshop</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/wdwphotoclub”>WDW Photo Club</a> on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

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An Introduction to Adobe Photoshop Lightroom

When Adobe first introduced Lightroom back in 2007 it was primarily designed for professional photographers. Lightroom takes advantage of the raw file format and allows the user to interpret what the final output should be. At the time, only professional cameras gave the user the ability to output in an uncompressed raw format. Even today, most people do not understand what the raw file format is, so let’s take a minute to explain. If you’re like most casual photographers your camera is set to distribute a JPEG file as a finished photo. This is actually a compressed version of your cameras original file format. Your camera does not actually take a JPEG image it uses a proprietary file format to capture the image and then compresses it to a final JPEG. Each camera manufacturer has their own file format. Nikon uses .NEF, Canon uses .CRW or.CR2, Sony also uses a couple of file formats one being SRF. Some manufacturers use a more generic uncompressed format called .TIF. No matter what file format your camera uses if your camera is set up to take JPEG pictures that will be its final output. Adobe devised a way to convert all of the different file formats into a generic uncompressed .RAW file format giving you the ability to in a sense “develop” your own final output. Today even some of the least expensive point-and-shoot digital cameras offer the users the ability to export in a raw file format whether it be TIF or the native file extension.

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