HDR Photography (an introduction)

By Christopher Rainville
HDR photography, or High Dynamic Range photography, has become quite popular in recent time.  By definition, HDR photography is combining different exposure values to one finished photograph. To understand why we do HDR photography it’s important to know how your camera works and more importantly, how it compares to the human eye. Continue reading

Using the Adaptive Wide-Angle Filter in Photoshop CS6

by Christopher Rainville
If you’re trying to solve a problem with wide-angle lens distortion the new Adaptive Wide-Angle Filter in Photoshop CS6 may be just what you need. In this video, the basics of using the new filter are explained as I go through a photo from start to finish.

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/45612433″>Adaptive Wide Angle Filter-Photoshop CS6</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/wdwphotoclub”>WDW Photo Club</a> on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Missing Photoshop Filters after Upgrading? Here is How to Get Them Back

by: Christopher Rainville
If you have upgraded to the newest version of Photoshop and find that you  are missing some items under the Filter drop-down here is how to restore them.
Only 9 plug-ins?

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Photoshop CS6, Whats New, Beta Review

There are a lot of new enhancements to Photoshop CS6. The first most notable change is the interface. The new screen looks more like Lightroom 4 then Photoshop with its darker background and light colored tool icons. If you prefer the lighter color of previous versions it can be changed.  There are a lot of changes in this version many of which are enhancements to the way certain items are selected and worked with. Many of these changes although superficial, make working with Photoshop much faster.  There are some items that have been moved to new locations for example users of Mini Bridge will now find it at the bottom of the screen and when opened, a Lightroom style filmstrip will be revealed. A lot of the changes are part of Adobe’s JDI initiative. The acronym JDI stands for “just do it” and stems from the Adobe Photoshop team surveying users and asking them what they would like Photoshop to “just do”. Some of these include, being able to make changes to multiple layers, an easier way to work with layers of text, and enhancements working with brush sizes. There are so many minor tweaks that it would be impractical to go through them all. Besides, most people want to know about the big juicy upgrades so let’s get started. Continue reading